Archive for the ‘Special Topics’ Category

Posting Reviews on hiatus.

Saturday, January 14th, 2012

With the Daily Herald switching to a subscription model to see Dann’s reviews, posting them here has been suspended until we can work out all the legal details.

100 Ways To Get a Bad Review (41-50)

Sunday, June 12th, 2011

When you think about it, a lot of places can tell filmmakers how to make movies: Columbia College. UCLA. USC. NYU.

  • But how many of them can tell filmmakers ways to avoid bad reviews of their movies?
  • I can.
  • I offer 100 ways to warn filmmakers – beginners and veterans – on how they can avoid making simple errors that can cost them major critical points when their pictures go to market.
  • Let’s face the ugly truth. Creative inbreeding in Hollywood has reached “Deliverance” proportions. I defy anyone to sit through three movies — any three of any genre – and not notice the same rusty lines of dialogue, the same arthritic visual devices, even the same lame props and set-ups.
  • Except for a handful of filmmakers who actually think outside of the Cliché Box (Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Jonathan Demme lead the very short list), many Hollywood storytellers seem content to let their movies become narrative viruses that simply replicate themselves as quickly as possible, with different casts, of course.

So, here come the next 10 of the 100 lamest, most unimaginative ways filmmakers can dare critics to dis their works. As for those filmmakers who continue to use the following elements of creative stagnation, I can only say on behalf of film critics everywhere, “Thank you. You’ve made our day.”

Read my 100 Ways To Get A Bad Review Page.

Daily Herald’s Gire joins Ebert’s ‘At the Movies’

Wednesday, January 26th, 2011
Roger Ebert, Christy Lemire and Ignatiy Vishnevetsky from "Ebert Presents At the Movies" Daily Herald Film Critic Dann Gire will be a contributing critic and correspondent on the new nationally syndicated TV show, “Ebert Presents At the Movies,” hosted by Associated Press’ Christy Lemire and Ignatiy Vishnevetsky of Mubi.com. It airs at 8:30 p.m. Fridays on WTTW.

Daily Herald Film Critic Dann Gire will be moonlighting on “Ebert Presents At the Movies,” Roger Ebert’s new nationally syndicated movie and current events show that airs locally at 8:30 p.m. Fridays on WTTW.

Gire was selected to be a contributing critic and correspondent. The first show aired Friday, though Gire’s first appearance has not yet been scheduled.

“I had to pinch myself when I got an e-mail from executive producer Chaz Ebert, asking me if I’d like to join the staff,” Gire said. “‘Ebert Presents’ is the ‘Maltese Falcon’ of TV shows. I know it’s going to be a lot of work, but I suspect it’ll also be a lot of fun.”

The show will be a new approach to Ebert’s popular, long-running movie review shows, which began 25 years ago as “Siskel & Ebert” and later was “Ebert & Roeper.”

“At the Movies” has nine supporting cast members, including Gire, and besides movie reviews will feature segments on current events and classic movies.

Other contributors include the “Today” show’s Alison Bailes, CBS News Analyst Jeff Greenfield and Nell Minow, the “Movie Mom” from beliefnet.com. (Read more…)

100 Ways To Get a Bad Review (51-60)

Monday, June 14th, 2010

When you think about it, a lot of places can tell filmmakers how to make movies: Columbia College. UCLA. USC. NYU.

  • But how many of them can tell filmmakers ways to avoid bad reviews of their movies?
  • I can.
  • I offer 100 ways to warn filmmakers – beginners and veterans – on how they can avoid making simple errors that can cost them major critical points when their pictures go to market.
  • Let’s face the ugly truth. Creative inbreeding in Hollywood has reached “Deliverance” proportions. I defy anyone to sit through three movies — any three of any genre – and not notice the same rusty lines of dialogue, the same arthritic visual devices, even the same lame props and set-ups.
  • Except for a handful of filmmakers who actually think outside of the Cliché Box (Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Jonathan Demme lead the very short list), many Hollywood storytellers seem content to let their movies become narrative viruses that simply replicate themselves as quickly as possible, with different casts, of course.

So, here come the next 10 of the 100 lamest, most unimaginative ways filmmakers can dare critics to dis their works. As for those filmmakers who continue to use the following elements of creative stagnation, I can only say on behalf of film critics everywhere, “Thank you. You’ve made our day.”

Read my 100 Ways To Get A Bad Review Page.

100 Ways To Get a Bad Review (61-70)

Sunday, August 16th, 2009

When you think about it, a lot of places can tell filmmakers how to make movies: Columbia College. UCLA. USC. NYU.

  • But how many of them can tell filmmakers ways to avoid bad reviews of their movies?
  • I can.
  • I offer 100 ways to warn filmmakers – beginners and veterans – on how they can avoid making simple errors that can cost them major critical points when their pictures go to market.
  • Let’s face the ugly truth. Creative inbreeding in Hollywood has reached “Deliverance” proportions. I defy anyone to sit through three movies — any three of any genre – and not notice the same rusty lines of dialogue, the same arthritic visual devices, even the same lame props and set-ups.
  • Except for a handful of filmmakers who actually think outside of the Cliché Box (Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Jonathan Demme lead the very short list), many Hollywood storytellers seem content to let their movies become narrative viruses that simply replicate themselves as quickly as possible, with different casts, of course.

So, here come the next 10 of the 100 lamest, most unimaginative ways filmmakers can dare critics to dis their works. As for those filmmakers who continue to use the following elements of creative stagnation, I can only say on behalf of film critics everywhere, “Thank you. You’ve made our day.”

Read my 100 Ways To Get A Bad Review Page.

100 Ways To Get a Bad Review (71-80)

Wednesday, July 8th, 2009

When you think about it, a lot of places can tell filmmakers how to make movies: Columbia College. UCLA. USC. NYU.

  • But how many of them can tell filmmakers ways to avoid bad reviews of their movies?
  • I can.
  • I offer 100 ways to warn filmmakers – beginners and veterans – on how they can avoid making simple errors that can cost them major critical points when their pictures go to market.
  • Let’s face the ugly truth. Creative inbreeding in Hollywood has reached “Deliverance” proportions. I defy anyone to sit through three movies — any three of any genre – and not notice the same rusty lines of dialogue, the same arthritic visual devices, even the same lame props and set-ups.
  • Except for a handful of filmmakers who actually think outside of the Cliché Box (Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Jonathan Demme lead the very short list), many Hollywood storytellers seem content to let their movies become narrative viruses that simply replicate themselves as quickly as possible, with different casts, of course.

So, here come the next 10 of the 100 lamest, most unimaginative ways filmmakers can dare critics to dis their works. As for those filmmakers who continue to use the following elements of creative stagnation, I can only say on behalf of film critics everywhere, “Thank you. You’ve made our day.”

Read my 100 Ways To Get A Bad Review Page.

100 Ways To Get a Bad Review (81-90)

Wednesday, July 1st, 2009

When you think about it, a lot of places can tell filmmakers how to make movies: Columbia College. UCLA. USC. NYU.

  • But how many of them can tell filmmakers ways to avoid bad reviews of their movies?
  • I can.
  • I offer 100 ways to warn filmmakers – beginners and veterans – on how they can avoid making simple errors that can cost them major critical points when their pictures go to market.
  • Let’s face the ugly truth. Creative inbreeding in Hollywood has reached “Deliverance” proportions. I defy anyone to sit through three movies — any three of any genre – and not notice the same rusty lines of dialogue, the same arthritic visual devices, even the same lame props and set-ups.
  • Except for a handful of filmmakers who actually think outside of the Cliché Box (Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Jonathan Demme lead the very short list), many Hollywood storytellers seem content to let their movies become narrative viruses that simply replicate themselves as quickly as possible, with different casts, of course.

So, here come the next 10 of the 100 lamest, most unimaginative ways filmmakers can dare critics to dis their works. As for those filmmakers who continue to use the following elements of creative stagnation, I can only say on behalf of film critics everywhere, “Thank you. You’ve made our day.”

Read my 100 Ways To Get A Bad Review Page.

Happy Birthday to Roger Ebert!

Wednesday, June 17th, 2009

Why a birthday tribute to Roger Ebert? You know, the Pulitzer Prize-winning syndicated film critic and author of a kajillion books and screenplays and Forbes’ most powerful pundit in America and television movie criticism pioneer and film scholar and educator and winner of the Peter Lisagor Award for Arts Criticism and too many other honors to mention?

Roger Ebert (Self-Portrait, 2006)
Roger Ebert
(Self-Portrait, 2006)

I can think of four reasons.

One, he has the wit and charm of Oscar Wilde.

Two, he has the encyclopedic knowledge of the imdb.com. (The professional version, not the free one.)

Three, he has the stamina of a marathon runner.

Four, he has — when it comes to star ratings — the generosity of Santa Claus.

Wait!

(Read more…)

100 Ways To Get A Bad Review

Wednesday, June 17th, 2009

When you think about it, a lot of places can tell filmmakers how to make movies: Columbia College. UCLA. USC. NYU.

  • But how many of them can tell filmmakers ways to avoid bad reviews of their movies?
  • I can.
  • I offer 100 ways to warn filmmakers – beginners and veterans – on how they can avoid making simple errors that can cost them major critical points when their pictures go to market.
  • Let’s face the ugly truth. Creative inbreeding in Hollywood has reached “Deliverance” proportions.  I defy anyone to sit through three movies — any three of any genre – and not notice the same rusty lines of dialogue, the same arthritic visual devices, even the same lame props and set-ups.
  • Except for a handful of filmmakers who actually think outside of the Cliché Box (Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Jonathan Demme lead the very short list), many Hollywood storytellers seem content to let their movies become narrative viruses that simply replicate themselves as quickly as possible, with different casts, of course.

So, here come the first 10 of the 100 lamest, most unimaginative ways filmmakers can dare critics to dis their works. As for those filmmakers who continue to use the following elements of creative stagnation, I can only say on behalf of film critics everywhere, “Thank you. You’ve made our day.”

Read my 100 Ways To Get A Bad Review Page.